‘Recruiting Daily’ Recognizes TAM Co-Founder, Edna Nakamoto

rosieEdna Nakamoto, CEO and co-founder of The Applicant Manager (TAM), was recently named by Recruiting Daily as “One of 300 Women in HR Technology Worth Watching”.

TAM, started in 2011 by Edna and her co-founder Jim Garrison, is an applicant tracking system that was born out of a recruiting need recognized through Edna’s work as a human resources consultant. Prior to venturing out on her own, Edna spent over twenty years serving in various human resources leadership roles. Continue reading

The Reality of Glassdoor – Have you seen what your employees are saying about you?

5-25 imageYears ago, companies could hide behind their impressive buildings and stock earnings, leaving potential employees wishing for a glimpse behind the marble-tiled foyer to find out how it might feel to be one of “them”. Knowing someone who worked there might be the lucky break that could give them the inside scoop they needed to find out bits of knowledge regarding salaries, corporate culture, and advancement opportunities.  This would sometimes be all the first-hand information available to a job-seeker before deciding to interview with a company they admired from afar.

Those days are over.

Not only are companies more purposely transparent through the use of websites and a heavy social media presence, but because of sites like Glassdoor, a TAM Integration Partner, their current and past employees have the opportunity to share anything they care to about things like pay, benefits, working conditions, hours, growth potential, and leadership. (see below information on the upcoming Glassdoor webinar)

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California Leads Nation in Gender Pay Reform

equal payFor over fifty years there have been laws in place requiring equal pay for men and women doing the same job. Even so, discrepancies in pay still persist. In California, where the new equal pay law, the Fair Pay Act, went into effect the first of the year, data introduced into legislation shows women being paid 84 cents for every dollar made by their male counterparts.

The Fair Pay Act, voted in with virtually no opposition, aims to make it harder for employers to require employees to do the same work, but pay some workers less because of job titles. Now, companies will be required to really take a look at each position, and the work required, and assess pay based upon the work actually being done. Rather than justifying pay with job titles, employers will need to thoroughly assess job responsibilities and requirements.

This new law may be most beneficial to those in positions typically classified as laborers such as housekeepers. In this example, a housekeeper commonly does the same work as a custodian, but because of their job title, is paid a lower rate.

Pay inequality may exist due in large part to the fact that people don’t know they’re being under paid. Within most companies, the culture is such that discussing pay is strictly prohibited. The Fair Pay Act prevents employers from terminating or punishing workers who discuss their pay with coworkers.

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Five Great Reasons for Building an Employer Brand

branding

Finding top talent in today’s marketplace has completely changed, and merely posting open job opportunities fails to draw in candidates. People want to find more than a job; they want to find a career that connects with their own values and goals, while making a difference larger than themselves.

There are companies with employer brands so strong that landing a job with them has become something of a status symbol. What makes these companies so successful at attracting potential employees is the message they’re sending out about themselves.
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Why goal setting should be a key part of your company culture

Basic CMYK

We hear about company culture quite a bit. Open concept offices, flexible hours, on-site gyms and a casual dress code. These influence a culture, but at the end of the day, how are we truly defining company culture?
A culture is the values and practices shared by the members that make up the culture. Company culture is the values and practices shared by the members, or employees, of a company. When we’re speaking about values, or as some organizations refer to them – core values, it’s important to remember that these values are the key to shaping the culture of a company. When a company knows exactly what their values are, their culture is defined, and the organization is in a position to clearly outline their goals.

Why is this important? A company without clearly defined goals has no destination in mind. Rather, the individuals or small groups that make up the company each have their own goals, but aren’t sure whether or not they align with one another on their way to achieving the larger over-arching goals of the company. This is a dangerous place for an organization to be in, as they have no idea where they’re headed.
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How to Hook Good Applicants with Strong Employment Branding

Building a strong brand presence should be more than just a focus for the marketing team. Creating a positive “employment brand” as defined here is an important component when it comes to recruitment. Companies like Google and Salesforce have reputations for being great places to work – from their creative and collaborative work environments to excellent perks, like Google’s free cafeteria for employees. When a company has a reputation for being an awesome place to work, applicants come flocking. As we all know, securing the best applicants is challenging in such a competitive market these days.  Applicants will reference social media, online reviews and will weigh the benefits that a company offers. Get applicants excited about working for you! A strong employment brand can be the extra factor that makes an applicant come work for your organization.
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